Expansion of The Federal Governments Power. If the federal government is not powerful enough, then conflicts are expected between the federal and state governments. In order for the country to stay united, it is important for the federal government to be more powerful. These are the cases that occurred in the early 1800 during the expansion of the federal government’s power:

In Marbury v. Madison (1803), which is one of the landmark cases, it was decided that if the congress violates a law of the constitution, the Supreme Court could go against it (Lively and Weaver). In the national bank case McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) (Hall and Patrick) the court ordered that the establishment of a national bank would be acceptable by the interstate commerce clause. In Martin v. Hunter’s Lessee (1816) and Cohens v. Virginia (1821), it was announced that appeals submitted by state courts can be heard by the Supreme Court (White). The superiority of the federal government over state laws was confirmed in McCulloch and Barron v. Baltimore in 1833 (Drakeman) The author states that the major issues that occurred in the expansion of the federal government were as briefly discussed above it is proven through these cases that every time there is a significant issue the government has to go an extra mile and it has to use its power in order to resolve it.

Establishment of a federal commission under the President Obama to fight against sexual assault is taking the time for the implementation as the number of victims is very high, and most of the schools have failed.

“Struggling with a similar assignment?”

Place an order below and we’ll get it done within the deadline selected.